Warriors

'It is around the Sogain all assemble to the conflict, for they are the body of every battlefield to all.'
('Nósa Ua Maine', c. 1100)

Chieftains

'The six Sogain with their cantred, to whomsoever of them they cede the chieftainship, he is called sub-king during his reign.'
('Nósa Ua Maine', c. 1100)

Kings

'The defeat of the fair of Moinmag by Conchobhar son of Toirdhealbhach on the Uí Maine, wherein Conchobhar Ó Ceallaigh was killed, and Ó Mainnín, king of Sogan, and others.'
(ATig., s.a. 1135)


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Mannion Clan Gathering,
18-19 August 2017

The fourth annual Gathering of the Mannion Clan took place on the weekend of Friday 18 and Saturday 19 August in the historic village of Menlough in East Galway. The event began with the formal unveiling on Friday evening of new welcome name stones on the approach roads to the village by Councillor Eileen Mannion, Cathaoirleach of Galway County Council.

Councillor Mannion’s officiating role was all the more significant given the fact that the medieval forerunner of the modern village was founded in late medieval times by her Ó Mainnín ancestors. This was where they erected their principal castle, which gave the village its Irish-language name Mionlach Uí Mhainnín, ‘the small lough of the Mannions’.

Members of the Mannion Clan from at home and overseas gathered for this historic occasion, as did many from the local community in the Menlough area, who have enthusiastically embraced the history and heritage of their picturesque rural village.

The unveiling ceremony was followed by the official opening of the 2017 International Mannion Clan Gathering in Thompson’s Lounge Bar by Galway County Heritage Officer, Marie Mannion. Marie highlighted the importance of the occasion in the annals of the Mannion Clan, and also in the broader context of promoting the rich history and cultural heritage of East Galway.

Afterwards, Clan historian Dr Joe Mannion gave a presentation on the early roots and royal ancestry of the Mannion Clan in ancient times, before genetic genealogist Martin Curley reported on the progress being made with the Mannion DNA Project, launched at the 2016 Gathering of the Clan in Abbeyknockmoy.

Music and refreshments followed the talks and the attendees mixed and mingled, renewing old acquaintances and making new ones, while sharing stories and recounting the intriguing history of their mutual Ó Mainnín forebears.

Many of the Clan assembled once again on Saturday afternoon in the car park of Mannion’s Bar in Abbeyknockmoy, for a guided tour of The Mannion Clan Historical Trail led by Dr Joe Mannion and archaeologist Dr Mags Mannion. After an introductory talk on the ancient Lughnasa assembly site of Knockroe, the remains of Killaclogher, Clooncurreen and Menlough castles in the parishes of Monivea, Moylough and Killoscobe were visited in turn.

During the course of the visit to the Mannion castle site at Clooncurreen, a newly erected information board, designed and sponsored by Skehana and District Heritage Group, was formally unveiled. The board features an artist’s impression of what the medieval tower house might have looked like when in use, together with some historical details relating to it and a brief history of the Mannion Clan.

Ramore inauguration and judicial assembly site in the townland of Mullaghmore West in Moylough parish was next on the itinerary. It was here that a Brehon law deed was drafted by a MacEgan lawyer in May 1584 for the Ó Mainnín Clan. In commemoration of this historic occasion, a translation of the original Irish-language agreement was read to members and friends of the Mannion Clan gathered on the ancient ceremonial mound, some four hundred and thirty-three years after the event. The sub-townland of Ballymannion, which with the modern townland of Cloonmweelaun was the focus of the Ó Mainnín deed, was then visited, as was our ancestral village of Menlough once again.

Saturday’s activities concluded in Kilconnell Abbey, where the last recorded Chief of the Name of the Mannion Clan – John son of Malachy – was buried in a tomb dated 1648, with two of his kinsmen from the Clan’s stronghold of Menlough. In this historically significant setting, the 2017 International Mannion Clan Gathering was brought to a close. The next Gathering of the Mannion Clan is scheduled for the weekend of Friday 17 and Saturday 18 August 2018. Why not join us for an unforgettable celebration of our unique family history and heritage . . . ?


Mannion Clan Gathering 2017

THE MANNION CLAN GATHERING for 2017 will take place in the Clan’s ancestral homelands of East Galway on Friday 18 and Saturday 19 August next. This year’s Rally will focus on the picturesque village of Menlough, originally known as Mionlach Uí Mhainnín, ‘the small lough of the Mannions’. It was here that the Ó Mainnín chieftains erected their principal castle in medieval times, around which a nucleated settlement developed with the passing of time.

This was the forerunner of the modern village of Menlough, where the venue for Friday evening’s historical talks, Irish music, song and storytelling is the well-known Thompson’s Pub, overlooking the site of the Ó Mainnín castle and the dried-up small lough that gave the village its name.

Saturday will see a repeat of the very popular annual guided tour of The Mannion Clan Historical Trail, led by Clan ollamh Dr Joe Mannion, ably assisted by Dr Mags Mannion who will give an archaeological perspective on the sites and monuments associated with the Ó Mainnín Clan in medieval times.

If you’re planning a visit to Ireland or Galway in 2017, why not arrange for it to coincide with the Mannion Clan Gathering on the weekend of 18 and 19 August? Already, people are planning to travel from Australia, Canada, USA, England, Scotland and from all over Ireland to attend the Rally, so why not join us and make it a truly memorable weekend? A warm Irish welcome awaits one and all! Fáilte isteach roimh cách!

If you plan to attend the Gathering, please let us know by emailing info@mannionclan.org.

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Mannion Clan Gathering, 19-20 August 2016

The third annual Gathering of the Mannion Clan took place on the weekend of Friday 19 and Saturday 20 August 2016 in the historic village of Abbeyknockmoy, County Galway. The focal point of this year’s rally was the launch of the Mannion DNA Project in The Abbey Inn on Friday night. This landmark event was attended by scores of Mannions and variants of the name, some of the Mannion diaspora having travelled from as far away as Australia, USA, Germany and England to join in the Clan celebrations with their namesakes and kinsmen from all over Ireland.

The evening’s proceedings began with the official opening of the 2016 Mannion Clan Gathering by County Galway Heritage Officer, Marie Mannion. Appropriately, Marie spoke of the importance of the occasion in the annals of the Mannion Clan, and also in the broader context of promoting the rich history and cultural heritage of East Galway.

There followed a lecture by Dr Joe Mannion, who recalled the early roots and royal ancestry of the ancient Clann Uí Mhainnín. Arising from this, Joe outlined the plans of The Mannion Clan Association for the erection of discreet directional and interpretive signage at the principal Ó Mainnín Clan sites, included in The Mannion Clan Historical Trail which was launched at the 2015 Gathering of the Clan. Dr Mags Mannion of the Archaeology Department of NUI Galway then delivered an enthralling, illustrated presentation on medieval Gaelic dress and ornament.

This was followed by the official launch of the Mannion DNA Project by Minister of State at the Office of Public Works, Sean Canney TD, who delivered an inspiring address on the subject. The newly-established undertaking comprises two separate but complementary components – the ‘Mannion by DNA’ network on Facebook, initiated and administered by local genealogist Martin Curley of Guilka, and the ‘Mannion Surname Project’ at Family Tree DNA, established and administered by Jim Hollarn of San Diego, California. Martin Curley briefed the attendees on the progress to date, and emphasised the importance of genetic genealogy as a means of connecting the Mannion diaspora with their relatives and their ancestral homelands in Ireland.

The evening concluded with traditional Irish music and song by Celtic Border, interspersed with absorbing storytelling by local seanchaí, Patrick Ward. Refreshments were served while old friends and new mixed and mingled, and recounted the intriguing history of their mutual Ó Mainnín forebears.

Many of the Clan assembled once again the following afternoon in the car park of Mannion’s Bar in Abbeyknockmoy, for a guided tour of The Mannion Clan Historical Trail. After an introductory talk on the ancient Lughnasa assembly site of Knockroe, the remains of Killaclogher, Clooncurreen and Menlough castles in the rich limestone plains of East Galway were visited in turn.

So too was Ramore inauguration and judicial assembly site in Mullaghmore West in the parish of Moylough, where a Brehon law deed was drafted by a MacEgan jurist in 1584 for the Ó Mainnín Clan. In commemoration of this historic event, a translation of the original Irish-language agreement was symbolically read to members and friends of the Mannion Clan gathered on the ancient ceremonial hilltop, some four hundred and thirty-two years later.

The day’s activities culminated at Kilconnell Abbey, where the last recorded Chief of the Name of the Mannion Clan – John son of Malachy – was buried in a tomb dated 1648, with two of his kinsmen from Mionlach Uí Mhainnín, now Menlough village near Ballinasloe. In these impressive and historically significant surroundings, the highly successful and very well attended 2016 Mannion Clan Gathering was brought to a close. The next Gathering of the Clan is scheduled to take place in the ancestral homelands of the Mannions in East Galway, on the weekend of 18 and 19 August 2017. Looking forward to seeing you there . . . !

The photo of the gathering attendees below is provided by courtesy of The Tuam Hearld.

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Mannion Clan Gathering 2016

Members and descendants of the Mannion Clan from at home and overseas will assemble in great numbers in the village of Abbeyknockmoy, Co. Galway on the weekend of Friday 19 and Saturday 20 August for their third annual Clan Gathering. This year’s Rally will feature the official launch of the Mannion DNA Project, which was recently established to assist descendants of the Ó Mainnín Clan of Co. Galway to discover genetic connections with others who share the same ancestry. It will also help to link the Mannion Clan to their ancient history and the ancestral origins of their Sogain forebears in East Galway.

This highly significant family history project comprises two separate but complementary components – the ‘Mannion by DNA’ network on Facebook, initiated and administered by local genealogist Martin Curley of Mountbellew, and the ‘Mannion Surname Project’ at Family Tree DNA, established and administered by Jim Hollarn of San Diego, California. The Mannion by DNA initiative aims to connect people worldwide who carry Mannion DNA, regardless of the surname they bear, and link the Mannion diaspora to their relatives in Ireland and the ancestral homelands of their forebears. On the other hand, the Mannion Surname Project will use the results of tests in Y-DNA, which is passed from father to son, to explore the deeper ancestry and ancient origins of the Ó Mainnín Clan.

The events of the forthcoming Gathering, which will coincide with National Heritage Week 2016, are free and open to all to attend. The activities of Day 1, Friday 19 August, will begin at 9.00 pm with registration, a meet and greet session and photo opportunities in The Abbey Inn, Abbeyknockmoy. The official opening of the 2016 Clan Gathering will follow. Attendees will then be treated to two short presentations on different aspects of the history of the Mannion Clan by Dr Joe Mannion and Chris Mannion from Merseyside, England. This will be followed by the official launch of the Mannion DNA Project by Minister of State at the Office of Public Works, Seán Canney TD. The evening will conclude with a medley of Irish music, dancing and storytelling, while complimentary refreshments will be provided for attendees.

On Day 2, Saturday 20 August, Joe Mannion will lead a guided tour of the chief residential, ceremonial and burial sites that make up The Mannion Clan Historical Trail. All interested in partaking in this event are asked to assemble in the car park of Frank Mannion’s Lounge Bar in Abbeyknockmoy before 2.00 pm for an introductory talk. Killaclogher, Clooncurreen and Menlough castle sites will then be visited in turn. So too will Ramore inauguration and judicial assembly site in Mullaghmore West in the parish of Moylough, where a Brehon law deed was drafted and signed in May 1584 for the Ó Mainnín Clan. In commemoration of this historic event, a translation of the original Irish-language agreement will be symbolically read to Mannions and others gathered on the ancient ceremonial hilltop some four hundred and thirty-two years later. During the course of the outing, Dr Mags Mannion of the Archaeology Department at NUI Galway will share her expertise on Gaelic dress and ornament. Their importance in asserting status, culture and gender and the different roles individuals held in the social group, family or clan will be explored and explained.

Also planned is a visit to a major photographic exhibition of estate houses of the landed society in Co. Galway, compiled and displayed by Skehana and District Heritage Group in the Skehana Community Grounds. The day’s activities will end at approximately 6.00 pm in the impressive ruins of Kilconnell Abbey. It was here that the last known Chief of the Name of the Mannion Clan – John son of Malachy – was buried in a tomb dated 1648 with two of his kinsmen from the Clan stronghold at Menlough, originally known as Mionlach Uí Mhainnín, ‘the small lough of the Mannions’. The Mannion Clan Association extends a warm welcome to all to attend these entertaining and educational National Heritage Week events. We look forward to meeting and greeting a great many Mannions and descendants and friends of the Clan from at home and abroad on both occasions.

Further information is available via the following Mannion related links:
https://www.familytreedna.com/groups/mannion-surname/about
http://www.heritageweek.ie/whats-on/event-details?EventID=903


Mannion DNA Project

Mannions worldwide are now able to contribute and compare DNA results. In collaboration with The Mannion Clan Association, Mannion by DNA, Family Tree DNA, and others, a Surname Project has been established that will allow Mannions to study their deep ancestry and genetic connections with others of Mannion descent. The Mannion Surname Project was launched at Family Tree DNA on 28 July 2016, and descendants of the ancient Ó Mainnín Clan, regardless of the anglicised version of the name they bear, are encouraged to participate in the project. While testing is a cost factor, Mannions who have tested among any of four companies are able to contribute their results for further study, to connect with genetic relatives, and explore deeper ancestry and origins of their family lines. Those interested in the project will find additional information at the following website: https://www.familytreedna.com/public/MannionSurname

Initial results will be available to attendees of the 2016 Mannion Clan Gathering in The Abbey Inn, Abbeyknockmoy, County Galway, Ireland on Friday 19th August, when the Mannion DNA Project will be officially launched. For those considering having a DNA test done, the following link offers helpful advice on testing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U_mPClKX3ls


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An Absolute Must For All Mannions And Their Relatives!

Descendants of the ancient and illustrious Mannion Clan of County Galway, who are in any way curious about their family background, will be eager to get their hands on a copy of the recently launched interpretive Guide to the Mannion Clan Historical Trail. The full-colour booklet conveniently incorporates a chronology and summary history of Clann Uí Mhainnín and their ancestors, spanning some 2,600 years. It also contains documentary information relating to the principal sites associated with the Mannion Clan in medieval and early modern times, as well as location maps to assist would-be visitors to discover their whereabouts. Copies of this detailed and wide-ranging family history publication can be purchased for €8 each from Kenny’s Bookshop - who offer free delivery worldwide!


Mannion Clan Gathering 2016

The next Gathering of the Mannion Clan has been scheduled to take place on Friday 19th and Saturday 20th August, in conjunction with National Heritage Week 2016. An evening of enlightenment and entertainment is planned for Friday 19th in Mannion’s Abbey Inn, Abbeyknockmoy, Co. Galway, where attendees will be treated to two short presentations on different aspects of the history of the Mannion Clan, to be followed by refreshments and live music and dancing. Saturday 20th will see a repeat of the very popular 2015 guided tour of the Mannion Clan Historical Trail, where the principal residential, ceremonial and burial sites associated with Clann Uí Mhainnín in late medieval and early modern times will be visited in turn. Our first two Clan Gatherings have been highly successful and very well attended events, and with the great interest that has been generated at home and overseas as a result, we anticipate another great Gathering of the Mannion Clan in 2016. Looking forward to meeting and greeting many old friends and new, so please put the above dates in your diary and join with fellow Mannions from around the world in celebrating our unique family history! In the meantime, you can listen to an overview of the history of the Mannion Clan by Dr Joe Mannion:
Click here to listen to the interview


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Mannion Clan Gathering, 21-22 August 2015

The second annual Gathering of the Mannion Clan of Soghan took place during National Heritage Week 2015 in the historic village of Abbeyknockmoy in County Galway. The focal point of this year’s rally was the launch of the Mannion Clan Historical Trail and interpretive Guide in the Abbey Inn on Friday night, 21 August. The much-anticipated event was attended by more than one hundred Mannions and friends of the Clan, many of whom had travelled great distances to be present, some having come overseas from England and Switzerland.

The evening’s proceedings began with a lecture by Clan historian Dr Joe Mannion, who recalled the early Celtic roots and royal ancestry of the ancient Clann Uí Mhainnín. Joe also gave the background to the establishment of the Mannion Clan trail, and outlined the future plans of the Mannion Clan Association for the erection of discreet directional and interpretive signage at the principal Ó Mainnín Clan sites in medieval and early modern times.

This was followed by a lively presentation from County Galway Heritage Officer Marie Mannion, who spoke about the significance of the project for the Mannion Clan and the heritage of East Galway in general. Marie also exhorted those present to begin compiling their individual family histories, if they had not already done so. The formalities concluded with the launch of the Mannion Clan trail and associated family history booklet entitled Clann Uí Mhainnín: The Mannion Clan Historical Trail: A Guide to Residential, Ceremonial and Burial Sites by Teresa Mannion of RTÉ. Teresa also regaled the audience with the background to her own branch of the Mannion Clan, and her father’s great endeavours to record the family’s genealogy during the course of his lifetime. The evening ended with refreshments being served, the mixing and mingling of old friends and new, and discussion and debate about the absorbing history of their mutual Ó Mainnín forebears.

Many of the Clan assembled once again the following afternoon in the car park of Mannion’s Bar in Abbeyknockmoy, for a guided tour of the chief settlement, ceremonial and sepulchral sites that constitute the Mannion Clan Historical Trail. After an introductory talk on the ancient Lughnasa assembly site of Knockroe, the remains of Killaclogher, Clooncurreen and Menlough castles in the limestone plains of East Galway were visited in turn. So too was Ráth Mór inauguration and judicial assembly site in Mullaghmore West, where a Brehon law deed was drafted by a MacEgan jurist in 1584 for the Ó Mainnín Clan. In commemoration of this historic event, a translation of the original Irish-language agreement was symbolically read by Patrick Mannion to fellow Clan members gathered on the ancient ceremonial hilltop.

The day’s activities culminated at Kilconnell Abbey, where the last recorded Chief of the Name of the Mannion Clan – John son of Malachy – was buried in a tomb dated 1648, with two of his kinsmen from Mionlach Uí Mhainnín, now Menlough village near Ballinasloe. All of the above places are discussed in the Guide to the Mannion Clan Historical Trail, which also contains an overview of the history of Clann Uí Mhainnín and their ancestors spanning some 2,600 years, illustrations and images of the principal sites associated with the Clan, and location maps to assist would-be visitors to discover their whereabouts. The next Gathering of the Mannion Clan is planned for August 2016, the dates for which have yet to be decided.


Launch of The Mannion Clan Historical Trail

Following a very well-attended lecture by Dr Joe Mannion entitled ‘The Mannion Clan of County Galway: Warriors, Chieftains, Kings’, hosted by Skehana and District Heritage Group in Menlough Community Centre on Friday 29 August 2014, the Mannion Clan Association is pleased to announce that two Clan related events have been scheduled to take place in conjunction with National Heritage Week 2015. On Friday 21 August, an exciting project fittingly named The Mannion Clan Historical Trail will be launched in the Abbey Inn, Abbeyknockmoy at 9.00 pm. This free event will provide an ideal setting for members and friends of the Mannion Clan to renew old acquaintances and make new ones, and to hear and discuss the unique history and heritage of one of Ireland’s oldest families in the company of fellow enthusiasts gathered there. A comprehensive ‘must-have’ interpretive Guide to the Trail, featuring a Clan chronology spanning 2,600 years, a summary history of Clann Uí Mhainnín, together with location maps, photographs and documentary evidence relating to the principal medieval and early modern Mannion Clan places will also be launched on the night. The speakers on this special occasion will include Clan historian Dr Joe Mannion, who will give a brief overview of the history of the Mannion Clan; Marie Mannion, Galway County Council Heritage Officer, who will highlight the importance of preserving and promoting our rich cultural and archaeological heritage in the context of this very worthwhile project; and the very popular Teresa Mannion of RTÉ, who will officially launch The Mannion Clan Historical Trail and Guide.

On the following day, Saturday 22 August, Joe Mannion will lead a guided tour of the chief residential, ceremonial and burial sites constituting The Mannion Clan Historical Trail. Once again, this is a free event which is open to everybody to attend. All those interested are asked to assemble in the car park of Mannion’s Bar in Abbeyknockmoy before 2.00 pm for an introductory talk. Killaclogher, Clooncurreen and Menlough castle sites will then be visited in turn, as will Ráth Mór inauguration and judicial assembly site in nearby Mullaghmore West. Here, a Brehon law deed was drafted and signed in May 1584 for the Ó Mainnín Clan, and in commemoration of this historic event, a translation of the original Irish-language agreement will be symbolically read to the Mannions and their friends gathered once again on the ancient ceremonial hilltop after an interval of four hundred and thirty-one years. The day’s activities will end at approximately 5.00 pm in the impressive ruins of Kilconnell Abbey, where the last known Chief of the Name of the Mannion Clan – John son of Malachy – was buried in a tomb dated 1648. Two of his kinsmen from Menlough, the principal stronghold of the Mannion Clan in later times, originally called Mionlach Uí Mhainnín, ‘the small lough of the Mannions’, are also named on a badly-weathered graveslab which is symmetrically placed before a Gothic canopied tomb niche on the north wall of the chancel. The Mannion Clan Association extends a warm welcome to all to attend these entertaining and enlightening Heritage Week events, and we look forward to meeting and greeting a great many Mannions, along with descendants and friends of the Clan from near and far on both occasions. And so, let your preparations to attend the next gathering of the ancient and illustrious Mannion Clan begin . . . !!

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Mannion Clan Lecture Night, 29 August 2014

In the region of two hundred people from near and far throughout the country attended the inaugural lecture on the Mannion Clan in Menlough Community Centre, County Galway on Friday 29 August last. Entitled 'The Mannion Clan of County Galway: Warriors, Chieftains, Kings', the illustrated presentation was delivered by Dr Joe Mannion, the leading authority on the history and heritage of this ancient Connacht family. The choice of venue was particularly appropriate in the circumstances, given that the village of Menlough – originally Mionlach Uí Mhainnín, ‘the small lough of the Mannions’ – owes its very existence to the Ó Mainnín chieftains, who established their principal castle and associated village here in late medieval times. Undoubtedly, this was the greatest gathering of Mannions in their ancestral stronghold for some 360 years, since the Mannion Clan were forcibly dislodged from their hereditary homelands in the Menlough area during the Cromwellian confiscations of the 1650s. The intriguing but little-known history of one of Ireland’s oldest families was duly charted during the course of Joe’s two-part presentation, in the middle of which light refreshments were provided by the Skehana and District Heritage Group, who organised this 2014 National Heritage Week event. The interval provided the attendees with an opportunity to mix and mingle with each other, renew old acquaintances and make new ones, and share their knowledge and interest in their mutual Ó Mainnín forebears. At the conclusion of his presentation, Joe outlined the various measures currently under consideration to commemorate and perpetuate the history and heritage of the Mannion Clan, including the proposed establishment of a Mannion Clan Association, the registering of the Clan with Clans of Ireland, the erection of discreet interpretive signage at significant Ó Mainnín sites, the giving of youth-targeted talks in local schools, online dissemination of information and images, the publication of a comprehensive history of the Mannion Clan, and the hosting of regular Clan gatherings in the years ahead. The feedback on the night and afterwards was extremely positive, and plans are in hand to form a Clan Council to oversee the future development of the Mannion Clan, and to organise events and outings of interest and benefit to its many enthusiastic members.


Skehana & District Heritage Group

will host a lecture by Dr Joe Mannion entitled 'The Mannion Clan of County Galway: Warriors, Chieftains, Kings' in Menlough Community Centre on Friday 29th August 2014 at 9.00pm

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Ruins of Killaclogher Castle at the site of a fourteenth-century Ó Mainnín stronghold, captured from the Mannion Clan by the O'Kellys about the year 1352

Clan History

The Mannion family name is an anglicised form of Ua/Ó Mainnín, signifying ‘descendant of Mainnín’, an early tenth-century king of the Sogain people of East Galway. This ancient clan can trace their roots in the medieval Irish genealogies to the Cruthin, the earliest band of Celtic settlers deemed to have reached Ireland about the sixth century BC. An Ulster prince called Sogan Sálbuide is reported to have been granted an extensive territory in Connacht between the Clare river and the Suck by the legendary Queen Medb about the time of the birth of Christ. Following the relocation of the Uí Maine people to the area about AD 500, the kingdom of Sogan became a sub-kingdom of Uí Maine (later Hy Many), and its Sogain inhabitants were obliged to render tribute and military service to the Uí Maine overkings.

As part of their martial obligations, the Sogain (under the customary leadership of their Ó Mainnín king) formed part of the household troops of Tadg Ó Cellaig at the battle of Clontarf in 1014, and played a pivotal part in the historic defeat of the Norsemen and their Leinster allies by the celebrated high-king Brian Boru. Likewise, under the year 1135 the annals inform us that ‘Ó Mainnín, king of Sogan’ was slain at the battle of Áenach Máenmaige (now Finnure in the parish of Abbeygormacan) while fighting with the Uí Chellaig against the Uí Chonchubair of Connacht. Again, the incumbent Sogain ruler Murchad Ó Mainnín was slain in a similar confrontation at Ruba Gealain in Co. Roscommon in 1180, while a later Ó Mainnín chieftain was killed in like circumstances at the battle of Roscommon in 1377.

The Ó Mainnín clan and their ancestral Cenél nDéigill sept were originally located to the west and south of the Killaclogher/Abbert river, in an area comprising the parishes of Athenry and Monivea, together with parts of Knockmoy, Kilmoylan and Lackagh. Encroachment eastwards over the Clare river by the Uí Briúin of Mag Seóla led to the loss of lands later included in Kilmoylan and Lackagh, while Athenry had been lost to the Clann Taidg sept of Síl Muiredaig extraction by the mid twelfth century. Finally, about the middle of the fourteenth century, Diarmaid Ó Cellaig captured the Ó Mainnín stronghold at Clogher (now Killaclogher), dispossessed the clan of their lands in the parish of Monivea, hanged the Ó Mainnín chieftain, and forced his kinsmen to migrate eastwards over the Killaclogher river. Here they dislocated some of the Uí Chon Chenainn of Uí Diarmada and later held most of the parish of Killoscobe, the central portion of Moylough, and two townlands in Knockmoy.

After their relocation, the ruling branch of the Ó Mainnín clan established their power centre at Menlough, originally Mionlach Uí Mhainnín, where a substantial castle with bawn and associated medieval village was erected in the fifteenth or sixteenth century. A collateral branch of the family seemingly erected Clooncurreen Castle about the same time. Ó Mainnín landholders continued to own and occupy much of their newly-acquired patrimony until the mid-seventeenth-century Cromwellian confiscations, at which time they were dispossessed and dispersed, with just small portions of the clan lands being restored to its former owners during the Restoration under Charles II (1660-1685). To this day, the Mannion clan continues to be strongly represented in the East Galway area.


About

This website is maintained by the Mannion Clan and is currently under construction. If you have any queries or comments, feel free to contact us on info@mannionclan.org